Iowa News from across the Country
- 1851 -

The Daily Ohio Statesman
Columbus, Ohio
Sat. January 11, 1851

Died. On the 14th November, 1850, at Keosauqua, Iowa, Alfred Moore, late of this county, and son of Simeon Moore, Esq., of Blendon township. The memory of young Mr. Moore, will be cherished by his many friends and acquaintances in this and the adjoining counties.

[transcribed by S.F., November 2016]

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The Daily Scioto Gazette
Chillicothe, Ohio
Monday, April 21, 1851

Married. At Burlington, Iowa, on the 1st inst., by Rev. I.I. Ingersol, J.W. Roberts, Esq., of Ironton, and Miss Caroline A. Sherfey, of the former place.

[transcripton note: see article from the Gazette, dated 4/28/1851, below; transcribed by S.F., November 2016]

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The Daily Scioto Gazette
Chillicothe, Ohio
Monday, April 28, 1851

Died, of Typhoid Fever, at the Ironton House on Saturday last, April 19th, about nine o'clock, P.M., Mr. Julius W. Roberts, aged 24 years.

Thus has it become our melancholy duty to record the death of the finest and most reliable friend of all the young men with whom we have ever been associated, and that, too, in the very next issue after we made record of his marriage! Born and raised in the same section of the country having passed through various vicissitudes in company, having traveled and roomed, read and studied, thought and acted together for several years past, it is to us a severe affliction.

Mr. Roberts was born at St. Johnsbury, Vermont, April 29th, 1827, came to Ohio in the spring of 1846, spent nearly a year at Chillicothe, was at Marietta about a year and a half, a portion of the time at College at that place, traveled South and West, and finally fixed his permanent residence at Ironton in March, 1850, as an Attorney at Law. He left Ironton on the evening of March 18th, for Burlington, Iowa, and little did we then think of the sad result which has followed, as we parted from him, on the 'Keystone State', full of health, life and activity, and buoyant with the highest expectations: "but truly as the Lord liveth, and as the soul liveth, there is but a step between me and death."

He was married on the evening of April 1st, to Miss Caroline A. Sherfey, daughter of Solomon Sherfey, near Burlington, Iowa, and on the following Thursday left with his trusting bride for Ironton, she being an only daughter, and leaving the kindest of parents for a home afar, and among strangers. On the following Sabbath he was taken sick at St. Louis in consequence of exposure, but as there was a good physician on the boat, he remained on board and arrived at Ironton in a low state, on Monday week, and for several days was thought to be in a convalescent state, but the insidious disease finally cut him off on Saturday evening, leaving his young and heart-stricken bride, a widow, in less than three weeks from her marriage. -Register

[transcription note: this was printed in an Ohio paper, possibly the original in the Register was from Iowa or Vermont. It was not identified by state. See marriage notice from the Daily Scioto Gazette, 4/21/1851, above; transcribed by S.F., November 2016]

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FREDERICK DOUGLASS PAPER
Rochester, New York
June 26, 1851

EMANCIPATED SLAVES. - Mr. Corry, a gentleman who has recently been a resident of Lewis County, Missouri, where he has been a slaveholder, has emancipated a family of slaves, and located them in Cedar township, Iowa, about four miles south of Salem, consisting of a man and his wife and eight children, valued at a round sum of eight thousand dollars. (N. Y. Evangelist)

[transcribed by C.J.L., December 2006]

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Sacramento Daily Union
Sacramento, California
July 10, 1851

Information Wanted - Mr. John W. Dryden who immigrated to this State from Keokuk, Iowa; was last heard of in El Dorado county. Any information concerning him will be thankfully received by Rev. D.A. Dryden, Marysville, to whom any communications may be addressed. San Francisco papers will confer a favor by copying.

[transcribed by S.F., July 2014]

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The Daily Ohio Statesman
Columbus, Ohio
August 30, 1851

Died, at Marion, Iowa, on Sunday the 11th inst., at the residence of her son-in-law, Judge Isbell, Mrs. Ann Pinch, in her 49th year.

[transcribed by S.F., November 2016]

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New York Daily Times
New York, New York
October 6, 1851

Died.
In Henry County, Iowa, 6th ult., Emeline, wife of O.D. Laughlin, and daughter of Mr. John Bangs, formerly of Yarmouth, Mass.

[transcribed by S.F., March 2007]

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Liberty Weekly Tribune
?, Missouri
November 14, 1851

A sad affair took place in Iowa, near Ottumwa, on Friday evening last. Mr. Robert Ralston, on the previous evening, had married the daughter of Mr. Jos. Woods; next evening a party visited Mr. Woods' house, to cheravari the newly married couple. They had all the usual accompaniments of such a ceremony; and as soon as the noise commenced Messrs. Wood and RAlston assailed the company by throwing stones at them. At this time one of the party, either by accident or design fired a gun, and shot Mr. Ralston in the left side, near the heart. He died the Monday following. Upon a post mortem examination, it was ascertained that he was shot with a paper wad, a portion of which lodged against the vertebral of the heart. Seven persons were examined, but no evidence was found to implicate them and they were discharged. It was a sad affair; and is another evidence of the folly of carrying fire arms on all occasions.

[transcribed by S.F., March 2005]

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New York Daily Times
New York, New York
November 19, 1851

The Hungarian Settlement in the West
We find in the Springfield (Ill.) Journal a 'summer view of New-Buda," the Hungarian settlement, under Gov. Ujhazy. It is situated in the southwestern part of Iowa, in the county of Decatur, at a distance of about 150 miles from the Mississippi river, 100 miles from the Missouri, and about 10 miles north of the boundary line of the State of Iowa and Missouri. The aspect of the country presents ridges of elevation, narrow ravines, and occasionally wide spread vallies, all covered with a rich soil varying from one to three feet deep which displays its fruitfulness in the abundant production of grass, of fruits and flowers. The Thompson river about 150 yards in width, but too shallow for navigable purposes, winds slowly through Decatur county in a south-eastern direction, on its way to the Missouri. Its course is lined by a heavy body of timber, from one to three miles wide, consisting chiefly of sugar-maple, black walnut, white oak and elm.On a high timbered ridge, on the left bank of this river, stands New-Buda, the residence of Gov. Ujhazy, and the intended abode of Kossuth. At this point the timber extends only a short distance from the river, and diverging circuitously to the north and south-east embraces an extensive open meadow covered with luxuriant grass, and crowned with a multitude of flowers, whose brilliant colors increase the liveliness of the scene. Viewed from the residence of the Governor, it seems one of the highest pictures of nature - its glowing beauties chastened and hightened by the surrounding gloom of forest. From the same place, through the foliage of trees, the Thompson river may be seen gliding along, the home of flocks of wild fowls, and the resort of troops of deer, which visit it to slake their thirst or cool themselves in its waters.

The dwelling is a log cabin, about fifty feet in length, twenty in width, one story high, with a shingle roof. The interior is divided into three compartments, and has a floor formed out of logs, split - the flat side smoothed and placed uppermost. One of these apartments, as is common in the Western country, is used for a kitchen, a dining, and a bed room. A modern cooking stove stands near the fire place, and opposite, on shelves and wall, cooking utensils and table furniture are neatly arranged. At the other end of the room two single beds are placed, elegantly furnished; the snowy white of their linen contrasting with the vivid hues of their oriental covers. A table stands near a window, loaded with books, documents and newspapers. Maps are displayed on the walls, and overhead is placed a collection of guns, pistols, swords and scimetars of the best material, the most skilful construction and superbly ornamented. But, most conspicuous of all is a splendid portrait of Washington, gazing, as it were, with a calm melancholy expression on those who lost wealth, exalted rank, endeared society and a beloved country in a hapless struggle.

In front of the dwelling a field, containing about twenty acres, is cleared , fenced and under cultivation. A flock of sheep, selected for their superior wool-growing qualities, feed in the pasture-ground, while over a wider range a heard of cows and several horses are scattered; every appearance promising to these hard-fated exiles a yet happy home.

[transcribed by C.J.L., October 2005]

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The Ohio Observer
Hudson, Ohio
December 10, 1851

Died, in Farmington, Iowa, July 28th, Mrs. Eliza Jane Thome, wife of Mr. M.H. Cooley, and sister of Rev. James A. Thome, of Ohio city, aged 37.

Mrs. Cooley was a consistent member of the Congregational church, and during the last years of her life, she gave marked evidence of growth in grace. Her vertues [sic] and accomplishments were such as fitted her for refined society, while she possessed some rare qualifications for usefulness. A wide circle of relatives and friends will feel their bereavement is all the more painful, because one has been taken who was to them an angel of mercy in the time of sickness. This beloved sister also possessed a happy faculty for devising ways and means to secure benevolent objects, and for sustaining charitable societies - for such labors she had the disposition, the judgement, the patience and the energy. On this account she was prepared to render valuable assistance to the wife of her pastor.

It should also be said that she was one of Israel's sweetest singers. Gifted with a smooth, flexible musical voice, she had by her own exertions, with limited opportunities, attained to a measure of distinction as a singer. Could she have enjoyed the advantages of musical cultivation afforded in some of our eastern cities, she would have taken a high rank among soprano singers.

 



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