Iowa News from across the Country
- 1891 -

Mitchell Daily Republican
Mitchell, South Dakota
January 21, 1891

Barely Made Their Escape
Emmettsburg, Iowa, Jan. 21- While John O'Connell and family of Walnut township were attending church in this city their house took fire and was totally destroyed. All of the contents also burned. Mr. O'Connell's father and an invalid sister were in the house at the time but had barely time to make their escape. Loss about $1,000.

[transcribed by C.J.L. May 2004]

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Arizona Republican
Phoenix, Arizona Territory
February 1, 1891

W.P. Marshal, who accompanied Governor Irwin from Iowa, coming to Arizona for his health, has been confined to his bed at the Commercial several days. Yesterday he was feeling better, and it is hoped the warm days will work continued improvement.

[see the entry, same paper for February 11, 1891, for details of the death of Mr. Marshal. He was from Keokuk & a cousin of Arizona Territorial Governor Irwin - transcribed by S.F., February 2007]

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Arizona Republican
Phoenix, Arizona Territory
February 11, 1891

Death of W.P. Marshall -- Decease in Phoenix of a Prominent Citizen of Keokuk, Iowa
William P. Marshall, late Sheriff of Lee County, Iowa, who arrived in Phoenix with his cousin, Governor Irwin, on January 19, died at the Commercial Hotel at 8:15 o'clock yesterday morning, of consumption. Mr. Marshall was a prominent citizen of Iowa, and was at one time a practicing attorney. About five years ago he contracted his fatal disease, and since that time has traveled in different parts of the country seeking relief. After arriving in Phoenix he failed rapidly, the journey across the country only hastening the end that was apparently near. Mrs. Marshall, the mother, and a younger brother of the deceased arrived from Keokuk last week, and have attended Mr. Marshall in his last hours. The remains were embalmed and taken by the bereaved mother and brother on this morning's train for Keokuk, where they will be interred.

[transcribed by S.F., June 2004]

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Eastern Utah Advocate
February 12, 1891

By Telegraph
In Dubuque, Iowa, Joseph Kuhn, a Russian Jew, has had two of his his country-men arrested for an alleged conspiracy to kill him. He is charged with mutilation of the bible which in Russia is punishable with death.

[transcribed by S.F., Nov. 2004]

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Arizona Republican
Phoenix, Arizona Territory
February 18, 1891

Arizona's Fourth Judge - Ed. Wells, of Prescott, Appointed to the new Position.
Washington, February 17 -- The nomination of Edward W. Wells, of Arizona, as Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of that Territory has been transmitted by President Harrison to the Senate. Ed. W. Wells was born in Lancaster, Ohio, February 14, 1846. When but seven years of age his parents moved to Iowa. The boy attended the public schools of Oskaloosa [Mahaska co.]. When sixteen years old he went to Colorado and there engaged in mining for two years, when he removed to Prescott, Arizona.
[remainder of the very lengthly article has been abstracted as follows: In 1867 he was appointed Clerk of the District Court, holding the office for seven years. Studied law and admitted to bar in 1875. Deputy US Attorney two years in the 1870's. Director of the Bank of Arizona in Prescott and real estate owner in Maricopa county, Arizona]

[transcribed by S.F., February 2007]

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Arizona Republican
Phoenix, Arizona Territory
March 18, 1891

The Auditor and Treasurer.
The Governor yesterday sent to the Council the nominations of Thomas Hughes, of Pima, for Territorial Auditor, and William christy, of Maricopa, for Territorial Treasurer, both of which were promptly confirmed. These appointments show a desire on the part of Governor Irwin to unite and solidify every element in the Republican party, and it is earnestly to be desired that success will attend his efforts. Hon. Wm. Christy has been chairman of the Republican Territorial Central Committee. While his appointment is not such as the Republican would have desired, because of his defection from the party at times, stil we can but hope that any tendency in that direction has all passed away and that henceforth no man will be more earnest in his party loyalty than Colonel Christy.

William Christy, chosen by the Executive to fill the office of Territorial Treasurer, was born at Warren, Trumbull county, Ohio, February 14, 1841. In 1854 his father relinquished mercantile pursuits and moving westward, established himself as a farmer in Clarke county, Iowa, where William received a good education. Upon the breaking out of the Rebellion William Christy enlisted as a private in Company I, Fifteenth Iowa Infantry, serving in that regiment one year. He was then transferred to the Eighth Iowa Cavalry, rising to the rank of captain. He was attached to Sherman's army until Atlanta was reached, when his regiment turned back with Thomas to hold Tennessee. During a skirmish in the rear of Atlanta, Captain Christy was wounded severely and fell into the hands of the enemy. He spent a whole year in Confederate prisions and hospitals, being for a short time successively in Millen and Andersonville. Exchanged in February, 1865, he rejoined his troop a poor advertisement for the fare in southern prisons, weighing less than 100 pounds. Captain Christy was afterward brevetted lieutenant- colonel of his regiment and remained with it till its disbandment in August, 1865, participating in the capture of Macon, Selma and Montgomery. Four wounds, two of them through the body, were retained as mementos of the days of raid and combat. Upon his return to Iowa, Colonel Christy attended college for a year and then entered a banking house at Osceola, Iowa. He was elected State Treasurer in 1872, by the modest majority of 62,000, and was reelected two years later. In 1876 he went back to the banking business in Des Moines. Colonel Christy came to Arizona in 1882, for the benefit of an oppressing asthma. He was one of the founders of the Valley Bank of this city, and has added materially to his worldly possessions in lands of the valley and by his interest in a number of profitable enterprises. Five children have been the fruit of a union contracted in 1866, with Miss Carrie E. Bennett, at Aurora, Ill. The family residence is located upon the outskirts of Phoenix and in the development of his fertile acres the financier finds his chief enjoyment.

[transcribed by S.F., June 2004]

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Evansville Enterprise
Evansville, Douglas County, Minnesota
Friday, April 10, 1891
Page 4, col. 3.

DIED.
BERGEN.—At her home, in town of Lund, Tuesday April 7th, aged 25 years, Mrs. Betsy Bergen, wife of Knute Bergen and daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ole O. Kjorn. Mrs. Bergen was born in Iowa, May 3, 1865. She leaves a husband and two small children to mourn their loss. The bereaved have the sympathy of their many friends and neighbors. The funeral services will be held Saturday at 2 o’clock p.m., from the Evansville Norwegian Lutheran church, Rev. T. A. Sattre officiating.

[transcribed by J.W., August 2004]
[Iowa Old Press note:  I checked the 1870 census for Iowa & don't find any Kjorn families listed.  I do find Mr. and Mrs. Ole O. Jellum and daughter Betsy (age 6)  in Wagner twp. Clayton co.  It is 'possible' that this is Betsy Bergen.  -- S. Ferrall, IOP coordinator]

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The Evening News
Mansfield, Ohio
Monday, June 1, 1891

The Andrews Raiders
History of the Raid and the Monument Dedicated at Chattanooga
The Andrews railroad raid occurred in the spring of 1862 and was one of the most thrilling incidents of the civil war. The possession of Chattanooga by the Union forces was the object of the raid. Gen. O.M. Mitchell, the commander in middle Tennessee, advanced with a detachment from Huntsville to within thirty miles of Chattanooga, which the Confederate forces occupied, on the 11th of April, and then came to a halt to await the result of a secret expedition that he had dispatched into Georgia three days before.

This expedition was guided and commanded by J.J. Andrews, a spy in the service of the Union generals. Twenty-four volunteers from Gen. Sill's brigade composed the expedition, and after many adventures they reached Marietta, Ga., dressed in citizens' clothes. At Marietta they boarded a train, and when it stopped for breakfast at Big Shanty station, on the Georgia railroad, two engineers and a fireman of the party sprang on the engine. Andrews and the others got into a baggage car and uncoupled the forward section of the train, which then started for Chattanooga. Big Shanty was a Confederate camp, and armed sentinels were witnesses of the whole proceeding.

After starting the troubles of the trip began. Trains were met and overtaken, and there were many narrow escapes from detection, and Andrews by plausible excuses, secured the right of the road for what he called an ammunition train hurrying to the front at Corinth.

At Big Shanty the conductor of the raided train, W.A. Fuller, and Andrew Murphy, a boss machinist in the road's employ, started on foot after the flying bobtail. They soon got a hand-car, and finally an engine that stood fired up on a side track, and were close on the heels of the raiders. An exciting chase followed. The raiders tore up the track and attempted to burn the bridges behind them, but the pursuers kept within sight, and nothing was effected in the way of hindering them.

Finally the raiders lost all hope of accomplishing their purpose of crippling the railroads around Chattanooga in aid of Mitchell's movement upon that point, and by Andrews' advice they abandoned the effort and took to the woods. All of the fugitives were captured in the course of a few days and taken to Chattanooga for examination, and being within the enemy's lines in citizens' dress were held to be spies. Seven of the men and Andrews, who was a well known spy, were executed and buried at Atlanta. Eight of the party broke guard and escaped to the north, and the remainder were subsequently exchanged.

Andrews was executed on the scaffold alone, on June 7, 1862, and on the 18th of June the following were hanged together: William Campbell, a civilian who volunteered to accompany the raiders; George D. Wilson, Company B, Second Ohio; Marion A. Ross, Company A, Second Ohio; Perry G. Shodrack, Company K, Second Ohio; Samuel Slavena, Thirty-third Ohio; Samuel Robinson, Company G, Thirty-third Ohio; John Scott, Company K, Twenty-first Ohio.

The following is a list of the survivors of the memorable raid:
Capt. William Bensinger, Twenty-first Ohio, McComb, O.; Capt. W.N. Brown, Twenty-first Ohio, Dowling, O.; Capt. D.A. Dorsey, Thirty-third Ohio, Kearney, Neb.; William J. Knight, Twenty-first Ohio, Stryker, O.; Capt. E.H. Mason, Twenty-first Ohio, Pemberville, O.; Capt. Jacob Parrott, Thirty-third Ohio, Kenton, O.; Rev. William Pittenger, Second Ohio, Ventura, Cal.; William H. Reddick, Thirty-third Ohio, Wapello, Iowa; J.A. Wilson, Twenty-first Ohio, Hoskins, O.; Capt. J.R. Porter, Twenty-first Ohio, Ingalls, Oklahoma.

[transcriber's note: William H.H. Reddick, the only Iowan in the raid, died in 1903. See the Nov. 13th issue of the Iowa State Press http://www.iowaoldpress.com/IA/Johnson/1903/NOV.html - transcribed by S.F., August 2009]

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New York Times
New York, New York
June 19, 1891

Gen. Schofield Married.
Miss Georgie Kilbourne Becomes the Bride of the Famous Soldier.
Keokuk, Iowa, June 18. -- The marriage of Major Gen. John M. Schofield to Miss Georgie Kilbourne, the daughter of Mrs. E.A. Kilbourne of Keokuk, has been looked forward to with the greatest interest by all classes of people since the announcement of the engagement was made. The city was decorated with flags and streamers to-day in honor of the event, and hundreds of visitors poured into the place, many of whom were unable to gain an entrance to the church and were compelled to satisfy themselves with gazing at the edifice wherein the marriage was being celebrated.

Gen Schofield and his party of friends arrived here at 8:15 A.M. on a special train from Burlington. The party consisted of the General, his sister Mrs. Wise, Miss Caroline Wise, Mrs. Edward Kilbourne and daughter, and Collin and William Fyfe of Chicago; Capt. C.B. Schofield, the General's brother, of Washington, D.C.; Lieut. A.D. Andrews, his son-in-law; Mrs. Andrews, and Lieut. T.N. Bliss.

St. John's Episcopal Church, one of the handsomest church edifices in Iowa, was beautifully adorned with festoons of oak leaves, studded with roses. Over two thousand roses were used in the decorations. At 11:30 o'clock the doors of the church were thrown open and the ushers, A.W. Kilbourne of Cleveland, Ohio; David Buell Cohn and William Fyfe of Chicago, Howard Elliott of St. Louis, and J.H. Sturgis of Keokuk, began to seat the guests. A few minutes before noon the bridal party arrived at the church. A platoon of police guarded the canopied entrance and kept back the crowd while the ushers received the bridal party, which, to the strains of the bridal chorus from "Lohengrin," marched to the altar. The bride was dressed in a heavy white corded silk. Her hat was trimmed with duchesse lace. She carried a silver prayer book. Gen. Schofield was in full uniform.

The Rev. Dr. R.C. McIlwaine performed the ceremony, assisted by Bishop Stevens Perry. During the service the prayer of Elizabeth from "Tannhauser" was played. As the bridal party left the church the organist played the wedding march from "Midsummer Night's Dream."

A reception was given to the bride and groom at the residence of Mrs. Kilbourne, and at 2:45 o'clock Company A, Second Regiment Iowa National Guard, and Curtis Camp, Sons of Veterans, preceded by bands, escorted Gen. Schofield to the Hotel Keokuk, where a public reception was held. Gen. and Mrs. Scholield, together with Lieuts. Andrews and Bliss departed at 5:30 in a special car for Omaha and San Francisco.

Among the prominent guests at the wedding were the Rev. James Schofield and his two daughters of Independence, Iowa; Miss Edith Fyfe of Chicago, and Mr. and Mrs. Hiram Barney of New-York.

Mrs. Schofield was born in this city on Nov. 9, 1864. She first met the General when she was fourteen years old, and through her friendship for his daughter was a frequent visitor at his house. When Miss Schofield married Lieut. Andrews, Miss Kilbourne was her maid of honor.

[transcribed by S.F. November 2006]

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Syracuse Daily Journal
Syracuse, N.Y.
Tuesday, July 7, 1891

Prohibitionists Attacked.
Dubuque, Ia., July 7 -- A man recently opened a saloon at Elkader. Realto Price, who has been prominent in enforcing the prohibition law, and his son, commanded the man to close the saloon. On his refusal, Price secured the City Marshal's aid and closed the saloon. As Price and his son were going home across a bridge last night a mob attacked them and cut them badly. They were forced to fly into an adjoining building and barricade the doors to keep the mob from executing their threats of lynching. Price and his son are in a critical condition.

[Transcribers note: Realto Price recovered from the mob attack. He was the editor of the 1916, 'History of Clayton County, Iowa'. Transcribed by S.F., June 2008]

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New York Times
New York, New York
August 14, 1891

Keokuk, Iowa, Aug. 13 -A terrible wind and rain storm visited Keokuk this afternoon. Half of the shade trees of the town were blown down, and the small buildings moved from their foundations. Lighting struck the amphitheatre at the fairgrounds. Ben B.. Jewell, bookkeeper of the savings bank, received a shock, at first thought to be fatal. There was a general panic throughout the city.

[transcribed by S.Y., June 2009]

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Daily Mitchell Republican
Mitchell, South Dakota
August 20, 1891

A Fiend for a Father
Mason City, Ia., Aug 20 -- A fiendish crime has just been committed in Osceola county. It seems that Michael Ohern had left one of his daughters to keep the pigs out of the garden while he performed his daily task on the farm. He is a man of very violent temper, and when he returned at noon he found that some pigs had eaten up some cabbage. He was raging with anger and went into the house and commenced a general abuse upon his daughter. She resisted as long as possible, and then to escape further injury started to run to a neighbors. At this the inhuman father grabbed an old revolver from the shelf and sent a ball through her body, entering just above the hip, coming out at the groin. The girl was picked up and carried into the house. The latest reports are that she is dying. The father is lodged in jail.

Neighborhood News - Badger
- Mrs. Lovejoy of Iowa, who has been the guest of Mrs. J.A. Kipp the past week, has gone to North Dakota to visit an invalid son who finds that climate beneficial to him.
Ethan
- Mr. E.E. Graves has gone to Akron, Iowa, for a few months.

[transcribed by S.F. August 2003 & June 2008]

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Daily Mitchell Republican
Mitchell, South Dakota
August 27, 1891

An Iowa Fire
Lyons, Aug 27 -- Fire broke out at Grand Mound, this county, at 2 a.m. in the rear of Voss' saloon, which was quickly destroyed. Six other store buildings were also destroyed. Hardly any goods were saved, and the total loss will be in excess of $20,000. The village had no water works system or fire aparatus.

[Transcribed by S.F., June 2008]

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Daily Mitchell Republican
Mitchell, South Dakota
August 28, 1891

Positive assurance is given from Washington that the Iowa Sac and Fox and Pottawattomie reservations will be opened for settlement Sept. 15.

Fort Dodge, Ia., Aug. 28 -- Another party of Illinois farmers well bear down upon this section of Northwestern Iowa this week. A special train containing 150 farmers, excursionists from Southern Illinois, will arrive in Webster City in a day or two. they will scatter all over the surrounding counties in search of homes. the large number of Illinoisans who settled here last fall have sent back enthusiastic accounts of the country, its crops and people, and their friends and neighbors are coming out by scores to locate here.

Des Moines, Ia. Aug. 28 -- The 37th annual session of the grand Lodge of Iowa Good Templars is in session here, with about two thousand delegates present. The grand lodge degree was conferred upon 130 new members. Grand Chief Templar Hutchins delivered his annual address. The report of Grankd Secretary Perkins showed 11,969 members in good standing, a net increase during the year of 991. Seventy-two new lodges were organized, 17 reorganized and 17 revived. The receipts during the year were $8,408.65 and the disbursements $387 less. Seventy-five new Juvenile Templar lodges were organized and 10 revived.

[transcribed by S.F. August 2003]

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Daily Mitchell Republican
Mitchell, South Dakota
August 30, 1891

The old settlers of Lee county, Iowa held their annual reunion at Fort Madison. Several thousand people were present. Ex-Senator George W. Jones of Dubuque was the orator of the day.

Mr. and Mrs. R.E. Walker of Clinton, Iowa and Mrs. McClain of Tripp, South Dakota, relatives of T.E. Blanchard and family, have been spending a few days with them. They left Saturday in company with Mr. and Mrs. Blanchard to spend Sunday with landlord Coates of Yankton. Mr. Blanchard starts for the Hills Monday.

[transcribed by S.F. August 2003 & June 2008]

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Daily Mitchell Republican
Mitchell, South Dakota
October 6, 1891

Davenport, Ia., Oct. 6 -- The name of W.F. Bacon, of Sabula, has been stricken from the Upper Iowa conference. Some time ago the Rev. Mr. Bacon bought a horse for $150. He had it professionally trained and it developed so much speed and quality that he sold it for $1,500. With a part of this money he bought anouther good horse and placed it in training. It ws entered in some local trots and won some money. It is now recorded in the 2:37 class. Mr. Bacon was admonished some time ago to stop horse racing. He failed to heed the warning. At conference, learning that he would have to sell his stable or withdraw from the ministry, he chose to do the latter and at his own request was dropped. He says he has so much money in horses that he cannot aford to drop the business.

[transcribed by S.F. August 2003]

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Eastern Utah Advocate
October 9, 1891

He Will Trot Horses
The Upper Iowa Methodist Conference has voted to admit women to the general conference as delegates and adopted lengthy resolutions in support of the Iowa prohibitory law and condemning law breakers and their sympathizers, notably Governor Boles for pardoning convicts of this class. W.F. Bacon of Sabula was dropped at his own request for owning, training and trotting horses at races. Mr. BAcon said that he had too much money in horses now to leave it for the church, and that if he could not trot horses and preach he would just trot horses.

[transcribed by S.F. Nov. 2004]

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Daily Mitchell Republican
Mitchell, South Dakota
October 21, 1891

Obituary
Las Vegas Daily 16: Miss Martha M. Dean, daughter of Sylvester and Catherine Dean, was born at Cascade, Dubuque county, Iowa, Dec. 20th, 1867, and died of pulmonary consumption, Oct. 16th, 1891, at 10 a.m. The deceased came, in company with her brother and mother, to Las Vegas, Sept. 4th, 1890, and thus prolonged her life. Her family will accompany the embalmed remains to Mitchell, Dakota, on Sunday morning, next, where another brother and a sister reside, and where the body will be interred. Miss Dean when seventeen years old, united with the Methodist church at Manchester, Iowa, where her membership was at the time of her death. She ever adorned her Christian profession with a pleasant, quiet, submissive, uncomplaining spirit, showing forth the power of grace to overcome all the trials of life, and at last death. A brief religious service will be held tomorrow, (Saturday) afternoon, at 4 o'clock, at the residence on Washington street, between Sixth and Seventh, conducted by A. Hoffman, pastor of the First Methodist Episcopal church, to which all the friends of the family are invited. Mrs. C.L. Dean and C.C. Dean returned to Mitchell today, while A.E. Dean accompanied the remains to Manchester, Iowa, for burial.

[transcribed by S.F. March 2006]

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Arizona Republican
Phoenix, Arizona
October 23, 1891

Frenzied by Rejection -- A Discarded Suiter Endeavors to Annihilate a Family.
Giard, Iowa, [Clayton county] Oct. 22 -- Half crazed over a love affair, Henry Hahn did some bloody work three miles southwest of this place this afternoon. For several years young Hahn had been paying attention to Miss Fanny Otto, a pretty girl of 18 years, and recently he asked the young lady's father for her hand. Mr. Otto refused on the ground that Hahn could not take care of a wife, and hinted that he was not quite blue blooded enough to marry into his family. This angered Hahn and he went away with a threat on his lips to murder the whole Otto family. This afternoon he showed up at the Otto farmhouse with a seven-shooter revolver and a big knife. He evidently intended to begin on the girl, as he first asked for her. He was told she was not at home, although concealed in an upper room, and he was requested to get off the place. At this he turned on Mr. Otto, the girl's father, and shot him through the heart killing him instantly. He then quickly fired two shots at Mrs. Otto, neither of which took effect. Young Henry Otto, hearing the noise ran in from the barn, and as he came within range Hahn began shooting at him. the fourth shot passed through young Otto's right lung inflicting a fatal wound. Hahn then ran into the house and tried to get at the girl whom he heard screaming upstairs. This he failed to do, owing to bolted doors, and he ran out and tried to escape. He eluded capture for an hour or two, but this evening the Marshal of Elkader, Iowa, wired that he had him safely in jail there.

[transcribed by S.F., May 2004]

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Littleton Independent
Littleton, Arapahoe co. Colorado
October 24, 1891

At McGregor, Iowa, on Sunday, a young farmer named Hahn killed John Otto and fatally wounded his son. They had forbidden Hahn paying attention to Miss Mary Otto, niece of the wounded man. There is talk of lynching Hahn.

[transcribed by S. F., July 2005]

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Daily Mitchell Republican
Mitchell, South Dakota
October 26, 1891

Council Bluffs, Ia., Oct. 24 -- A fire in the stable at the driving park resulted disastrously, several valuable horses being burned to death. Heavy losers are P. Sweet, $3,000; Searles & Ellsworth, $6,000; and Chamberlain, of Denver, $6,000. there are other small losses and the Driving Park association is a heavy loser. It is supposed to be an incendiary fire.

Marshalltown, Ia. Oct. 26 -- A special from Lake City says: A terrible collision occurred late Friday night between two heavy freight trains on a branch of the Chicago and Northwestern railroad. Both trains were fearfully wrecked. M.R. Hayden and George Stein, both brakeman living at Lake City, were instantly killed. Engineers Collins and McAllister were probably fatally injured and other trainmen considerably hurt. The accident occurred on a curve.

[transcribed by S.F. August 2003]

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Daily Mitchell Republican
Mitchell, South Dakota
October 30, 1891

Local Mention - H.A. Adams arrived today from Cedar Rapids, Iowa

Dubuque, Ia. Oct. 30 -- Seventy-five girls employed in the Rider, Wallis & Co. overhall factory, in this city have struck because of a reduction of 6 cents per dozen in rates paid. The reduction was made on account of a new attachment to sewing machines. The proprietors claim the girls can earn just as much as they did before.

[transcribed by S.F. August 2003]

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New York Times
New York, New York
November 9, 1891

To Marry His Divorced Wife.
The Singular Experience of Arthur Wilson in Matrimony.
Wichita, Kan., Nov. 8. -- A strange experience is that of Arthur Wilson and his divorced wife, who, after thirteen years' separation, met here again yesterday. Wilson having come from Morris, Minn., where he is a prominent citizen, to claim the lady he still supposed his wife.

The two were married in Sioux City, Iowa, in 1877, and had lived together but a year when Wilson disappeared. No trace of him could be found, and the wife some months later left the State and went to Omaha, where, after getting a divorce, she married a young merchant named Fleming, who afterward turned out to be a scamp, and who four years ago was arrested in Missouri for forgery in Omaha was taken back and sentenced to seven years in the penitentiary. Mrs. Fleming has been in this city for two years, and only a few days ago was seen and recognized by an old friend, who informed her former husband, Wilson, of her whereabouts. Wilson, who says he was the victim of a blackmailing conspiracy, which caused his disappearance from Sioux City, and who had been searching for his wife all these years, lost no time in getting here, and the result has been satisfatory explanation. As soon as Mrs. Fleming can get a divorce she will again become Mrs. Wilson.

[transcribed by S.F., November 2006]

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Helena Independent
Helena, Montana
November 25, 1891

Sister Basilisi, one of the teachers at St. Vincent's academy, died at the St. Johns hospital yesterday. Sister Basilisi was known in the world as Miss Josephine Fitzgerald, and was born in Iowa twenty-nine years ago. Her father still resides there, and she has a sister living in Cheyenne, both of whom were notified of her death. She became a religense three years ago and in January last came here from the mother house in Leavenworth. As a teacher at the academy she was one of the most successful in the history of that institution, and a persistent worker and much beloved by her pupils. The cause of her death was a complication of troubles brought on by an injury to the hip. She had frequent recurrences of the trouble, but her last illness only extended from Saturday last. Her condition became so alarming yesterday morning that it was decided to remove her from the academy to the hospital, where she died a few hours later. Death was entirely unexpected. The funeral will take place on Thursday morning, at 10 o'clock from the cathedral, and Rev. Lawrence Palladino will conduct the services. The academy were dismissed yesterday as soon as Sister Basilisi's death was learned.

[transcribed by S.F., January 2014]

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Rolla New Era
Rolla, Missouri
November 28, 1891

Local & Personal
-Miss May Flett, grand daughter of Judge and Mrs. C.H. Frost, of this city, was married on Sunday last at her father's home near Salem to I.B. Walker, of Sioux City, Iowa. We trust she is Sioux-ted.

[transcribed by S.F., December 2005]

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Daily Mitchell Republican
Mitchell, South Dakota
December 20, 1891

Ninety Years Old
Dr. Andros Has Practiced Medicine for Nearly Three-Quarters of a Century.
Sioux Falls Press: The oldest practicing physician in South Dakota is Dr. Frederick Andros of Mitchell who is in the city attending United States court as a witness in the Helgerson $20,000 damage suit against the Milwaukee railway company. The doctor has been actively engaged in the practice of his profession for sixy-seven years and was given a doctor's certificate by the board of medical censors for the territory of Michigan January 31, 1834. This certificate, yellow with age, the doctor still retains and proudly exhibits to his acquaintances. His life has been spent entirely on the frontier and in 1833 he traveled from Detroit in a farm wagon across the then territories of Michigan and Illinois to Dubuque, landing at the latter point in November, 1833. Chicago, then Ft. Dearborn, was only a small settlement with not over a dozen cabins, and as there were no settlements west until the Mississippi was reached, the doctor and his wife purchased provisions enough to carry them through at the fort. After settling in Dubuque they remained there four years, when the fever and ague drove the doctor to the highlands and he located upon the prairie in Clayton county, Iowa. He remained for nearly thirty years on the same quarter section of land, his farm passing from the jurisdiction of the territory of Michigan to the territory of Wisconsin and from the latter territory to the territory of Iowa and finally to the state of Iowa.

The doctor was born in Bristol county, Massachusetts, in 1802, and is in his 90th year -- Thomas Jefferson was then president. The doctor's father was a soldier during the revolutionary war, and was one of the unfortunates who suffered the horrors of the New Jersey prison ships off New York. He afterwards became a Presbyterian divine and died in Massachussetts. Said the doctor, "when I came west the country was new and with not over 2,000 population, north and west from Dubuque in the United States. The trip west from Chicago was in those times considered a great feat and one worthy of admiration. Rivers had to be forded and roads were an unknown quantity."

The doctor has smoked continuously for eighty-two years and while a temperate man, has been in the habit of taking his toddy when he wished it. His health, he asserts, is gradually declining and he doubts if he can live over two or three years more.

[transcribed by S.F., March 2006]

 



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