Iowa News from across the Country
- 1916 -

Fairbanks Daily Times
Fairbanks, Alaska Territory
January 12, 1916

Reuben E. Todd Is Inquired For. Has Not Been Heard from in 12 Years - Was in Dawson in 1903.
From Rev. Guy H. Madara, of Chena, the following letter was received, which is self explanatory:
Chena, Alaska, Jan. 10, 1916
Fairbanks Daily Times, Fairbanks, Alaska
Gentlemen: I have an inquiry on my desk from Mrs. J.F. Tood, Lock Box 381, Neola, Iowa, in which she asks for information concerning one Reuben Earle Tood, who came to Alaska in 1910, and has never been heard of since his arrival at Dawson on his way in. He is about thirty-five years old now. Any information will be gratefully received, either by the writer of the letter, or by the undersigned.
Very sincerely yours,
Guy H. Madara

Any person who has any knowledge of the whereabouts of the above mentioned man may communicate with Mrs. Todd, Rev. G.H. Madara, or with the Times. Any information will be gladly received.

[transcriber note: names and dates were typed exactly as they appeared in the news article; the Fairbanks Sunday Times also carried the letter, but in an abbreviated form. The date given in that article was 1903, and the surname Todd. Neola is in Pottawattamie co. Iowa. Transcribed by S.F., April 2007]

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Summit County Journal
Breckenridge, Summit co. Colorado
February 12, 1916

Col. W.P. Hepburn Dies At Clarinda - Soldier and Former Member of Congress, Succumbs to Heart Weakness - Framed Hepburn Law
Clarinda, Iowa. -- Col. William P. Hepburn, former member of Congress, from this district, died here after a long illness. Death resulted from kidney and heart trouble. Besides the widow, a son and daughter survive him. Col. Hepburn, although twenty years in Congress, became best known throughout the country during the Roosevelt administration. It was called the Hepburn law prohibiting rebates and discrimination by railroads. As chairman of the House committee on interstate and foreign commerce in the first session of the fifty-ninth Congress, he was th eauthor of three acts out of five which the then President Roosevelt afterward declared would cause that Congress to be memorable in history because of its constructive legislation. Mr. Hepburn represented the Eighth Iowa district. He also was an efficient soldier in the Civil War and a lawyer of high reputation. He was a product of the early pioneer days in Iowa and got what little schooling he had in three winters at an academy near Iowa City. He was born in Columbiana county, Ohio, Nov. 4, 1833, removing to Iowa City, where his mother and stepfather took up their residence on a farm when he was eight years of age. After a brief experience in the schools the community afforded he got employment in a printing office, where he worked for four years. Later he read law at Iowa City and Chicago, being admitted to the Illinois bar in 1854. He returned to Iowa in 1855, married Miss Melvina A. Morseman of Iowa City, and settled at Marshalltown.

[transcribed by S.F., May 2006]

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New York Times
New York, New York
February 16, 1916

The wedding of Miss Mildred Anne Joy, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Clyde R. Joy of Keokuk, Iowa, and Hugh J. Robertson of Iowa, took place yesterday afternoon at the Hotel St. Regis. The Rev. J.T. Stocking of Upper Montclair, N.J., officiated. Mrs. Ralph B. Joy was the bride's only attendant. Harold Covington Pond was best man. A dinner, followed by dancing, was held after the ceremony. The couple left for California on their honeymoon.

[transcribed by S.F. February 2007]

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Sheboygan Press
Sheboygan, Wisconsin
February 22, 1916

[By Associated Press]
Emmetsburg, Iowa, Feb. 22- The Rev. M.H. Case, former pastor of the Congregational church here, is dead at his home today, a suicide by shooting. Yesterday he told a friend he wanted to see the village undertaker. When the undertaker arrived he found the minister dead.

[transcribed by C.J.L., Jan. 2004]

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Mt. Pleasant Pyramid
Mt. Pleasant, Sanpete co., Utah
Friday, March 17, 1916

Local News
Albin Halstrom left Thursday to resume his work as electrical engineer in Marshalltown, Iowa.

[transcribed by S.F., October 2015]

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Fairbanks Daily Times
Fairbanks, Alaska Territory
March 23, 1916

Race With Death Starts This Morn
On the stage for the coast this morning, Mr. and Mrs. J.A. Webb will start a race with death. Mr. Webb recently received a telegram informing him that his mother, who is well advanced in years, had undergone a serious operation, from which she probably would never recover, and that her condition at the time the telegram was sent was dangerous. Mr. Webb immediately decided to start for Mount Ayr [Ringgold co.], Iowa, where his mother lives, in the hope that he may reach her before death comes. Mr. Webb will be accompanied by his wife. After he has seen his mother, if he wins his race with death, Mr. Webb will go to Rochester, Minnesota, where he will seek relief from the Mayo brothers. Last summer, Mr. Webb injured his spine, and he has never fully recovered from that injury. He is ging to see if the Mayos can ascertain what the trouble is and cure him of it. If it is possible for him to do so, Mr. Webb will return over the trail, but Mrs. Webb will stay Outside until after the opening of navigation. Mr. Webb will return over Lake Labarge if he does not come in over the trail. During the absence of his parents, George, the young son of Mr. and Mrs. Webb, will live with Mrs. J.E. Moody, and the Webb home will be closed.

[transcriber notes: The 1885 U.S. census, Ringgold co., Poe twp. shows J.A. Webb's family: father Alford G. age 48; mother Lucitta, age 43; Sherman A., age 20; John A., age 18; William D., age 16 and Olla J., age 13. The 1915 Iowa State census enumerated one Lucretia Webb, a 72 year old widow in Mt. Ayr. Transcribed by S.F., April 2007]

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Ogden Standard
Ogden, Utah
April 10, 1916

Deaths and Funerals
Odermatt - Peter Odermatt, son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles M. Odermatt died at 12:55 p.m. yesterday at his residence, 2218 Read avenue, of a complication of diseases from which he had suffered nearly 18 months. He was born in Dubuque, Iowa, March 13, 1883, and had lived in Ogden 12 years. Prior to his illness, the deceased was employed as a railroad brakeman. He was a member of the Woodmen of the World and Eagles lodges. Mr. Odermatt is survived by his wife, formerly Mrs. Priscilla Covington, one son, two daughters, and the following brothers and sisters: Charles A. and Henry Odermatt of Ogden; Noah Odermatt of Minneapolis, Minn.; John Odermatt of Manchester, Iowa; Mrs. Margaret Faust and Mrs. Jennie Simmons of Bellevue, Iowa; Mrs. Tena Leonard and Mrs. Lulu Wiley of Oakland, Cal. The funeral will be held tomorrow at 2 p.m. in the Second ward meeting house and interment will be in the city cemetery. The members of the Eagles and Woodmen of the World will attend the funeral service in a body. Remains may be viewed at the Lindquist chapel from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday. Funeral services will be held at 2 p.m. tomorrow in the Second ward meeting house.

[transcribed by S.F., October 2015]

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Fairbanks Sunday Times
Fairbanks, Alaska Territory
May 14, 1916

A letter received by a friend in Fairbanks tells of the safe arrival of Mr. and Mrs. J.A. Webb in Mt. Ayr, Iowa. They reached there about the 12th of April and the letter was dated a week later. Mr. Webb states that his mother's health is greatly improved and that when she heard Mr. and Mrs. Webb were coming to see her she brightened up. She has improved so much that she is now able to sit up several hours a day. Mr. Webb did not state when he would start for Fairbanks, but he expected when he left here to come back on one of the first boats if possible.

[transcribed by S.F., April 2007]

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Wyoming State Journal
Lander, Wyoming
August 8, 1916

Lander has two newspapers. The oldest paper is democratic and bears the name of the Wind River Mountaineer, and the editor is Henry J. Wendt, formerly of Iowa. The other newspaper is The Wyoming State Journal, edited by Arthur H. Maxwell, formerly of Waukon, Ia. Mr. Maxwell is a nephew of the late Judge Granger of the Iowa Supreme court. Both offices are well equipped and have the reputation of making good incomes.

[transcribed by S.F., Dec. 2013]

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New York Times
New York, New York
September 10, 1916

Special to The New York Times. Williamsport, Penn., Sept. 9 -- Miss Margaret Ellen Long, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William A. Long of this city, and Lieutenant Robert Alfred Lavender, U.S.N., son of Mr. and Mrs. J.F. Lavender of Rockwell City, Iowa, were married at 8 o'clock this evening at the home of the bride's parents, 730 West Third Street. Chaplain John B. Frazier, U.S.N., officiated. The bridegroom and his attendants, Lieutenants Henry M. Kiefer and Morris D. Gilmore, U.S.N., were in full dress uniform. The bride was attended by the Misses Gladys Lessey of Derby, Conn., Edith L. Miller of Harrisburg, Penn., and Katharine M. Wolfe of Chatham, N.J. Lieutenant Lavender is a graduate of the Naval Academy at Annapolis, Md., class of '12. He has specialized in radio science, and was one of six naval officers selected a few years ago and sent to Paris to represent this Government in determing the logitudinal distance between Paris and Washington. He is at present radio officer of the destroyer force of the Atlantic fleet. The bride is a granddaughter of the late Thomas McFall McIlhenney.

[transcribed by S.F., June 2010]

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Chicago Daily Tribune
Chicago, Cook, Illinois
October 1, 1916

Mrs. Ellen Callaghan of Spencer, Iowa. Was Born Sept. 29, 1816.
One hundred years ago last Friday Mrs. Ellen Callaghan of Spencer, Iowa, was born and baptized Ellen Regan in County Cork, Ireland. In 1837, the year Michigan was admitted to the union, she was married to Daniel Callaghan. They had eight children, four of whom died in infancy. In September, 1860, the family came to America, locating first at Green Lake, Wis. Thirty-three years ago they again moved, this time to government lands in Clay county, Iowa, near the present site of the village of Royal. Five years ago Mrs. Callaghan took up residence with her son John in Spencer. Her four surviving children are Owen, aged 77, and John, aged 68, of Spencer; Patrick, aged 75, of Sioux City, and Michael, aged 70, of San Diego. Patrick and Michael are both veterans of the civil war.

[transcribed by C.J.L., March 2005]

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New York Times
New York, New York
October 1, 1916

Newport, R.I., Sept. 30 -- Mrs. Evans, wife of Commander Waldo Evans, on staff duty at the Naval War College, announces the engagement of her niece, Miss Jeanette Ashton of Grinnell, Iowa, to William T. Sherman of Chicago. The wedding is to take place here the latter part of December. Miss Ashton has been visiting Commander and Mrs. Evans at the Naval War College since early Spring. Miss Ashton and Mr. Sherman were graduated together from Grinnell College.

[transcribed by S.F., June 2010]

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Salt Lake Tribune
Salt Lake City, Utah
November 5, 1916

Tremonton Society
Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Gephart have as their guests Mrs. Gephart's mother, Mrs. Addie Anthony of Boulder, Colo., and her aunt, Mrs. C.A. Monatt of Hampton, Iowa.

[transcribed by S.F., October 2015]


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